Stránka:roll 1910.djvu/58

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… usual procedure. And officers are more readily found because the scheme is elastic and leaves much to their own initiative and responsibility, without demanding a too rigid obedience to rules or the continual rendering of returns on their part.

Scouting has, therefore, broken out as a separate institution of its own, not only in most of our big towns in Great Britain and Ireland, but also in Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Canada, with a promise of further extension in other countries such as Germany, America, Russia, Denmark, Norway, Austria, Argentina, and Chile.

THE GREAT POSSIBILITY

The suggestion has been made that since it has thus “caught on” with the boys themselves it might with proper organization form an instrument for instruction of every boy in the country.

Whether it does so or not depends entirely on our getting men to come forward to act as scoutmasters in every district, with that aim constantly before them, namely, of roping in everything in the shape of a boy that is not already under some influence for good.

HOW TO CATCH OUR BOYS

I do not in these “Hints” propose to teach my grandmother to suck eggs; and, therefore, I only address them to those who have had no previous practice in teaching boys, or who wish for explanations with which to meet criticisms or inquiries into our scheme. They are merely a few notes from my own small experience in that line, and tend to explain some of the arrangements of details in the Handbook.

When you are trying to get boys to come under good influence I have likened you to a fisherman wishful to catch fish.

If you bait your hook with the kind of food that you like yourself it is probable that you will not catch many — certainly not the shy, game kind of fish. You therefore use as bait the food that the fish likes.