Stránka:book 1913.djvu/200

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1 78 The Book of Woodcraft one hour, so that should be the limit of distance that ordinarily you tramp from your starting point. At five o'clock all hands should gird up their loins and face home- ward. These are some rules I have found good in hiking: Do not go in new shoes. Be sure your toe nails and corns are well pared before going. Do not take any very little or weak fellows. Be prepared for rain. Take a pair of dry socks. Travel Indian file in woods, and double Indian file in roads. Take a Book of Woodcraft along. Always have with you a rule and tape line, knife, some string, and some matches. Take a compass, and sometimes a pocket level. Take a map, preferably the topographical survey. Take a notebook and a pencil. Do not waste time over things you can do as well, or better, at home. And last, and most important, it is wise to set out with an object. Here are samples of the ideas I have foimd useful as objects for a short hike in winter: To determine that hard maple (or other timber) does or does not grow in such a woods. To prove that a certain road runs north and south. To decide whether the valley is or is not higher than the one across the divide. To prove that this or that hill is higher than such a one. To get any winter fungi. To look for evergreen fern.