Stránka:ets biographical sketch 1925.djvu/22

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Tato stránka byla zkontrolována


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1896

Studies in the Art Anatomy of Animals; being a brief analysis of the visible forms of the more familiar animals and birds. Designed for the use of sculptors, painters, illustrators, naturalists, and taxidermists. Illustrated with one hundred drawings by the author. London, New York, Macmillan and Co., Ltd., 1896. 96 pp. “A list of the principal works consulted”: pp. 86–7. About 100 original drawings of animals and birds illustrating the essentials of their anatomy from the artist’s point of view. Out of print.

The Baron and the Wolves. Forest & Stream, Vol. XLVII, New York, Dec. 26, pp. 504–506, with 6 illus. by the author. An amusing story of life in Russia. (Fiction.)

1897

Intercommunication of Wolves. Forest & Stream, Vol. XLVIII, Jan. 23, pp. 64–65. New York. Showing the use of odor glands and odor posts as a means of intercommunication.

A Horned Cow Elk. Forest & Stream, Feb. 20, p. 145. 10 lines and one drawing.

How Bull-fighting Was Suppressed in France. Our Animal Friends, Feb., pp. 128–129. New York.

Some More About Wolves. Forest & Stream, Vol. XLVIII, March 6, pp. 183–4. On the habits of wolves; about 1000 words.

A Biography of E. T. Seton by Myra Emmons. Recreation Mag., N.Y., Vol. VI, May, 1897, pp. 315–33. Although written by Myra Emmons it contains many long quotations from Seton’s writings and sayings. It is illustrated with 13 large drawings by himself and 3 photos: himself, his wife, and their home.

An Interview with Whitman’s Spirit. Recreation Mag., Vol. VI, June, p. 480. In praise of the bicycle, after the manner of Walt Whitman.

The Woodduck. Our Animal Friends. Vol. XXIV, July, pp. 256–7, New York. A natural history sketch of the woodduck with one illus. by the author.

Directive Coloration of Birds. The Auk. Vol. XIV, Oct., pp. 395–6, with full page plate of hawks and owls in flight. Plate IV. Reproduced with additions in Bird Lore, Nov., 1901, under title “The Recognition Marks of Birds”.

Chanticleer vs. Egret. Forest & Stream, Vol. XLIX, Oct. 9, p. 283. Pointing out the possibility of developing a breed of the common barnfowl that will grow plumes like those of the egret.

The Yellow-leg and the Hens. Our Animal Friends, Vol. XXV, ..text continues