Stránka:book 1913.djvu/446

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424 The Book of Woodcraft weighs 36 lbs. Leaves 2 to 3 inches long. It has a black triangular scar at each armpit. Que. south to Md. White, Canoe or Paper Birch (Betula papyrifera) A tall forest tree up to 80 feet high; the source of bark for canoes, etc. One of the most important trees in the north- ern forest. Besides canoes, wigwams, vessels and paper from its bark, it furnishes syrup from its sap and the irmer bark is used as an emergency food. Every novice redis- covers for himself that the outer bark is highly inflammable as well as waterproof, and ideal for fire-lighting. Though so much like the Gray birch, it is larger, whiter, and with but small black scars at each limb. The timber is much the same, but this weighs 37 lbs. Its leaf and catkin distinguish it; the former is 2 to 3 inches long. All Canada and south to 111. Yellow Birch, Gray Birch (Betula luiea) A forest tree, of 30 to 50 feet height. Bark obviously birch, but shaggy and gray or dull yellow. Wood as in the others, but reddish. A cubic foot weighs 41 lbs.