Stránka:book 1913.djvu/28

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6 The Book of Woodcraft which Wild Animal Photography is an important branch; but above all, Heroism. Over three hundred deeds or exploits are recognized in these various departments, and the members are given decorations that show what they achieved (6) Honors by Standards. The competitive principle is responsible for much that is evil. We see it rampant in our colleges to-day, where every effort is made to discover and develop a champion, while the great body of students is neglected. That is, the ones who are in need of physical development do not get it, and those who do not need it are over-developed. The result is much unsoundness of many kinds. A great deal of this would be avoided if we strove to bring all the individuals up to a certain standard. In our non-competitive tests the enemies are noV the other fellows," but time and space, the forces of Nature. We try not to down the others, but to raise ourselves. A thorough appli- cation of this principle would end many of the evils now demoralizing college athletics. Therefore, all our honors are bestowed according to world-wide standards. (Prizes are not honors.) (7) Personal Decoration for Personal Achievements. The love of glory is the strongest motive in a savage. Civil- ized man is supposed to find in high principle his master impulse. But those who believe that the men of our race, not to mention boys, are civilized in this highest sense, would be greatly surprised if confronted with figures. Nevertheless, a human weakness may be good material to work with. I face the facts as they are. All have a chance for glory through the standards, and we blazon it forth in personal decorations that all can see, have, and desire. (8) A Heroic Ideal. The boy from ten to fifteen, like the savage, is purely physical in his ideals. I do not know that I ever met a boy that would not rather be John L. Sullivan